Wednesday, 13 March 2013

LEARNING IN YOUR SLEEP

A series of blog entries about sleep hygiene, body processes while  sleeping and related issues. Today’s entry reads about losses caused by sleep inertia.

LOSSES CAUSED BY SLEEP INERTIA. HOW TO OVERCOME
 
Obviously, most of us are looking for “fast-food” solutions.

Though, CAFFEINE only suppresses your sleep inertia but doesn’t decrease it whereas an ALARM CLOCK and its evil snooze option increasing your adrenalin level simply stresses you out.

Just like fast food turns your body into the anti-fit substance, caffeine ruins adrenal, causes heart diseases, increases cholesterol levels etc.


What actually works is certainly NORMAL SLEEP PLANNING.

Not a secret: each hour of sleep before midnight is worth 2 hours after;
a precious time when your nervous system has rest.
Though, it might contradict your day planning.

- Remember that your natural wake-ups are the result of your optimal sleep duration.
- Schedule your regular go-to-bed time and stick to it.
- Try not use the alarm clock at all.
- Never press the Snooze button.
- Use EASYWAKEme as your healthy assistant in detecting the optimal wake-up moment.

 



Read in the next post: The early bird catches...

Fill in the survey form at http://survey.easywake.me/index/surveyform
and GET A FREE SAMPLE OF EASYWAKEme.


 

Friday, 1 February 2013



SLEEP INERTIA. HOW IT FEELS


In the morning, we feel like returning to sleep or right after awakening we can’t perform well mentally or physically.

Sleep inertia refers to the feeling of grogginess most people experience after awakening. It can last from 1 minute to 4 hours, but typically lasts 15-30 minutes.

During this period you may have trouble doing even simple everyday actions.



WHY IT APPEARS


Sleep is a recovering process for our body and nervous system.
Unfortunately, our chances of sleep inertia are quite high.
According to our research, there’s 89% chance to have sleep inertia
and it’s definitely not something you want to have a big chance of!


DON'T WAKE UP IN REM OR NREM SLEEP


Waking up during REM you still have high levels of melatonin which causes sleepiness.

Waking up during NREM your blood pressure, heart rate, and brain activity is lower in comparison with wake state. In result, you feel grogginess and slowing of reflexes.

SOLUTION

Waking up between REM & NREM our body is the closest to the awakening state as:

- nervous system works as usual
- melatonin level (sleepiness) is decreased
- brain activity is close to the one at the awakening state
Some people describe awakening at this moment as free and easy,
just like they were about to wake up without any alarm clock!

So, even though sleeping long enough, one may feel exhausted and
SLEEPING ENOUGH IS JUST NOT ENOUGH!

The only way to avoid sleep inertia is to 
wake up in the transition between two phases. As a regular alarm clock doesn't know about any phases, it wakes us up interrupting sleep phases.

So you either work on your natural alarm clock and try to develop the skill of waking up without any alarm clock at the time you need, or try the EASYWAKEme alarm clock that can help to detect this transition and wake you up at the optimal moment.



Read in the next post:
Losses caused by sleep inertia and how to overcome

Learn more how to participate beta testing of EASYWAKEme